About dunes properties of Charleston

dunes properties of Charleston is a real estate, vacation rental and property management company representing the Lowcountry with almost 80 exclusive Charleston beach vacation rental properties, 70 real estate agents and employees, four full-service offices. Nobody knows the Charleston Coast better.

Isle of Palms Office

1400 Palm Boulevard
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
843.886.5600

Real Estate Inquiries:
realestate@dunesproperties.com
Vacation Rental Inquiries:
vacations@dunesproperties.com


Folly Beach Office

31 Center Street
Folly Beach, SC 29439
843.588.3800

Real Estate Inquiries:
realestate@dunesproperties.com
Vacation Rental Inquiries:
vacations@dunesproperties.com


The Real Estate Studio

214 King Street
Charleston, SC 29401
843.722.5618

Real Estate Inquiries:
realestate@dunesproperties.com
Vacation Rental Inquiries:
vacations@dunesproperties.com


Kiawah Seabrook Office

1887 Andell Bluff Boulevard
Johns Island, SC 29455
843.768.9800

Real Estate Inquiries:
realestate@dunesproperties.com
Vacation Rental Inquiries:
vacations@dunesproperties.com


Trigger
Open
Open
Open
Join Our Mailing List
Open

Category: Historic Charleston

Insider’s Guide to Downtown Charleston Neighborhoods

Downtown Charleston Neighborhoods

It’s no coincidence that Charleston has been named America’s Best City by Travel + Leisure for the past five years. With its urban amenities, quaint Southern style, and fascinating history, Charleston is a city that appeals to people of all ages and backgrounds.

Downtown Charleston has a variety of neighborhoods that each present its own unique charm. From the famous and historic South of Broad neighborhood to the lively neighborhood of Harleston Village, you can easily find your own slice of Lowcountry living in the Holy City.

Ansonborough

Considered Charleston’s first suburb, Ansonborough is a historic neighborhood filled with elegant architecture and rich history. Although many tourists and commuters pass through the neighborhood as they head to the shopping district, Ansonborough is full of historic buildings and stunning views that beg to be admired.

Ansonborough is said to be named after Captain George Anson, who fiercely defended Charleston’s coastline from pirates. The neighborhood was first laid out in 1745-1746 and prospered until a fire destroyed the area in 1838.

Ansonborough was rebuilt, along with many of its now historic homes, including the William Rhett House—the oldest private residence in Charleston. Many of the buildings were rebuilt in a Greek architectural style, with grand columns and piazzas.

Today, Ansonborough has a reputation for its dedication to the arts. From ballet to opera to comedy, there is always some art form that is on display. This thriving neighborhood is also mere minutes away from shopping, restaurants, and entertainment.

What’s to Love: Ansonborough may be located in a bustling area, but the homes in this neighborhood are hidden under the shade of large oaks and palmetto trees. This diverse area includes both luxury condominiums and townhomes, as well as historic homes which are highly-sought after.

King Street Historic District

The King Street Historic District is a highly-sought after neighborhood — for good reason! You will find it all in this diverse, downtown area including dining, nightlife, shopping, and history.

This neighborhood is divided into three distinct areas: Upper King Street, which runs north of Calhoun Street, Middle King Street, which is known for being Charleston’s Fashion District, and Lower King Street, which is the Antiques District.

Although housing mostly includes condos and lofts above the storefronts in the commercial district, you will find historic homes in the King Street Historic District as well. Parking can be difficult in this area, so many residents don’t bother with cars and enjoy walking where they need to go.

What’s to Love: If you love being in the center of it all, you will enjoy living in the King Street Historic District. Young professionals are attracted to the area due to the modern amenities and upscale dining opportunities. You can’t go wrong with oyster bars, swanky cocktail clubs and local microbrews.

Downtown Charleston Neighborhoods

South of Broad

One of Charleston’s most notable neighborhoods, South of Broad is known for its famous historic homes such as Rainbow Row and the mansions overlooking The Battery. Located below Broad Street, this neighborhood offers history buffs the chance to step back in time and live in an area where horse-drawn carriages transported visitors across cobblestone streets.

With its elegant architecture and easy access to the Charleston Harbor, South of Broad is guaranteed to give you stunning views. It’s not surprising that so many people choose this neighborhood as their vacation home.

What’s to Love: It’s difficult to explore Charleston’s rich history in just one visit. By choosing to live South of Broad, you can take your time and uncover the Holy City’s fascinating history at your own pace. Even the locals haven’t experienced Charleston to its fullest, and you will learn something new with every outing.

Cannonborough/Elliotborough

Once two separate boroughs, the Cannonborough/Elliotborough was named after Daniel Cannon, a carpenter and mechanic who ran several mills in the area, and Colonel Barnard Elliot, a prominent member of the Provincial Congress. Considered a gateway to the Charleston Peninsula, it has transformed over the past decade, now considered as an up-and-coming neighborhood.

Today, Cannonborough/Elliotborough is home to a diverse mix of families and college students. Growth has exploded over the past decade, and commercial revitalization is taking over Spring Street and Cannon Street, leading to many unique and young businesses.

What’s to Love: You will find some great hole-in-the-wall places to eat in Cannonborough/Elliotborogh. Sugar, a bakeshop located on Cannon Street, is mere blocks away from Upper King Street and uses locally-sourced ingredients in their sweet treats. Trattoria Lucca has also made a name for itself as one of the best authentic Italian Restaurants around the region.

Besides the food, you will love how affordable the neighborhood, especially considering that it is located in downtown Charleston. Plus, the area has plenty of notable schools for families, both public and private.

Downtown Charleston Neighborhoods

French Quarter

Bordered by the Cooper River to the east, Broad Street to the south, Meeting Street to the west, and Market Street to the north, the French Quarter is “walled” within Charleston and is steeped in rich history. As you may have guessed, this neighborhood was named after the large number of French merchants who settled the area to escape religious persecution.

The French Quarter is distinguished by its Classic Revival style architecture, beautiful cobblestone streets, quaint theatres, and art galleries. Notable historic buildings include Pink House, the oldest stone house in Charleston (built in 1712) as well as one of the oldest buildings in South Carolina. You can explore Charleston’s rich military history at the Powder Magazine, the only remaining government building from the original Lords Proprietors.

This charming neighborhood is also home to Charleston’s Waterfront Park, which features plenty of fountains for the kids to splash around in and offers spectacular views of the Cooper River and Charleston Harbor.

What’s to Love: Along with its beautiful scenery and rich history, the French Quarter offers a place to live in relaxed luxury. One minute, you are strolling through the cobblestone streets and courtyard gardens, and the next minute, you are surrounded by modern amenities, including fashionable retail stores and fantastic dining opportunities.

This hidden gem of Charleston doesn’t have many single-family homes available, but there are plenty of condominiums in the French Quarter, some of which offer stunning views of the water.

Harleston Village

This thriving and diverse neighborhood has something for everyone to enjoy. Whether you are searching for a historic home with Southern charm or a modern townhouse, you can find a healthy mix of both in this neighborhood.

Developed in the 18th century, Harleston Village is nestled along the Ashley River and bordered by Calhoun Street, Broad Street, and King Street. Residents enjoy being within walking distance to shopping and fine dining opportunities, as well as Colonial Lake, a pedestrian-friendly area where many locals go for morning jogs.

Although this neighborhood boasts its fair share of historic buildings and antebellum homes, it attracts many modern professionals and families due to its proximity to prominent schools. Harleston Village is home to Mason Preparatory and Charleston Day, which are two of Charleston’s most prestigious private schools. It is also near the College of Charleston and the Medical University of South Carolina.

What’s to Love: Harleston Village offers many rewards for families, young professionals, and students. The neighborhood schools are top-notch and while there are a large number of modern amenities, you will still spot historic homes with elegant Georgian and Italian architecture throughout the neighborhood.

Downtown Charleston Neighborhoods

Radcliffeborough

Just north of Harleston Village is Radcliffeborough, a small yet vibrant neighborhood which, like Harleston Village, houses its fair share of doctors, students, and families. This dynamic neighborhood is home to Ashley Hall, the prestigious private school for girls, and is in close proximity to the Medical University of South Carolina and the College of Charleston.

Built in 1815, Radcliffeborough was originally farm land purchased by Thomas Radcliffe in 1786. Although Radcliffe was lost at sea in 1806, his wife, Lucretia, continued to develop the land.

Mrs. Radcliffe gave a large donation of land to the Third Episcopal Church, which was built in 1811. Now called the Cathedral of St. Luke and St. Paul, the beautiful church was nicknamed “The Planter’s Church” because it was largely used by the many rice planters in the area.

Many newly constructed homes share the same block with massive antebellum mansions, creating a unique neighborhood of history and modern amenities. Homes are generally more affordable in this neighborhood, compared to other downtown areas above Calhoun Street.

What’s to Love: Residents of Radcliffeborough enjoy strolling down to beautiful Marion Square, one of Charleston’s most beloved parks and home to the Charleston Farmer’s Market. Residents are also close to Upper King Street, which boasts some of Charleston’s best dining and nightlife.

Mazyck-Wraggborough

Often called the Garden District, the Mazyck-Wraggborough neighborhood has more public green space than any other area on the Charleston Peninsula. This peaceful area is situated between Calhoun, Mary, East Bay, and Meeting Streets, named after John Wragg, who inherited the land in from his father in the 18th century.

Many of the streets are named after the Wragg descendants, such as Elizabeth, Charlotte, and Ann Street. The Wragg family later donated green spaces for public use, including the historic parks, Wragg Square and Wragg Mall.

Mazyck-Wraggborough was once a neighborhood for people who wanted to escape the busy city life, but much has changed since the 1800s. Today, the neighborhood attracts professionals, families, and students who want to live within walking distance of the finest Charleston eateries, the College of Charleston, entertainment, and easy access to Ravenel Bridge.

What’s to Love: Mazyck-Wraggborough residents enjoy the multiple parks and green spaces in the neighborhood. In addition to Wragg Square and Wragg Mall, the neighborhood is located near popular Marion Square, where residents can attend festivals or enjoy the balmy weather.

Downtown Charleston Neighborhoods

Final Words

The neighborhoods in downtown Charleston are so unique and diverse that it can be difficult to choose which one is best suited for you. Whether you are searching for a nice place to raise a family, a lively urban hub, or a place surrounded by natural splendor, the neighborhoods of downtown Charleston offer generous options that will suit even the most discerning palettes.

 

 

Philip Simmons Ironworks in Downtown Charleston, Part One

We recently introduced you to Philip Simmons, the wrought-iron artist who furthered Charleston’s ornamental gate tradition with his signature masterpieces seen throughout the city. If you recall, the craftsman passed away in 2009, but his workshop remains open on Blake Street downtown, where family members continue to keep his name and skills alive by crafting more memorable works. It’s also now a museum and book shop, so folks can still learn about Simmons and his contributions to the city.

That’s why we’ve included the Philip Simmons House as the first stopping point in this guide, although the rest of this list will concentrate below Calhoun Street (don’t worry- we’ll explore more of his works, including some north of Calhoun Street in a later post). Of these stopping points, some are quite grand, while others are easy to pass by if you don’t know what you’re looking for. There are no plaques nearby for these works and there’s not much fanfare. Some have become part of folks’ everyday lives, whether they know it or not – especially South of Broad, where you find ironworks on many if not most houses. His works blend into the scenery beautifully, but if you know where to look, Mr Simmons’s signature stamp can be seen in every neighborhood on the peninsula.

The Philip Simmons House, 30.5 Blake Street
At the Philip Simmons house, apprentices and family members continue their mission to preserve Simmons’s legacy. He created hundreds of hand-wrought iron fences, gates, and more, and he did it all from his little garage at his modest home on Blake Street. Here, you’ll get to have a short, free, informative yet informal tour that will leave you with a better understanding and a deep appreciation of the great importance of a man so beloved by his neighborhood and by all of Charleston.

91 Anson Street
Stroll over to 91 Anson where you’ll find St John’s Reformed Episcopal Church and its decorative gates bearing a wrought-iron heart and cross. There you can also wander beyond the gate and inside the Philip Simmons Garden. The entrance gate was designed by Philip Simmons, and crafted at his shop by Carlton Simmons (nephew) and Joseph Pringle (cousin). The original drawings Simmons made for the gate are kept in the Avery Research Center at the College of Charleston and can be viewed online thanks to the Lowcountry Digital Library. The gate is magnificent, but the gardens behind the gate are equally lovely and worth a stroll. 

Philip Simmons gate, 91 Anson Street

Photo Courtesy of Philip Simmons Foundation

313 King Street
At 313 King Street is Simmons’s first walkway gate, the Krawcheck residence, which we discussed in an earlier post. You may remember that 313 King is actually the storefront address of the Grady Ervin clothing store, and if you ask the kind folks who work there nicely, they will point you to a door in the back of the store that leads to this beautiful, historic work. This is said to be Mr. Simmons’s very first commission in Charleston.
Philip Simmons gate 313 King St

138 Wentworth Street
At 138 Wentworth Street, the grand driveway gate of the Edwin L. Kerrison House (circa 1838) towers high above the fence and exudes elegance. The house was restored in the 1970s and that is presumably when Simmons created the gate, which includes examples of his signature perfect spirals.
Philip Simmons gate, 138 Wentworth Street

45 Meeting Street
The railings and window grills at 45 Meeting Street are attributed to Simmons. The walkway gate that opens to the front yard also exudes the Simmons aesthetic with a beautiful swirling floral pattern.
Philip Simmons, 45 Meeting Gate

2 St. Michael’s Alley
One of Simmons’s most famous and photographed works is the Egret Gate at 2 St Michael’s Alley. The alley is a quiet, short street just south of St Michael’s Church between East Bay and Meeting Streets. The gate separates the back of the driveway from the backyard and when cars are parked in the drive, it’s hard to see the full gate. This design features an egret in the center standing atop the letter R.

Philip Simmons, 2 St Michaels Alley

Photo Via Wikipedia

67 Broad Street
The archway grate and gate at 67 Broad Street is attributed to Simmons. Both incorporate Simmons’s curling style as well as his perfect symmetry.
Philip Simmons, 67 Broad Street

78 East Bay Street
78 East Bay is an example of one of Simmons’s works you may easily pass without noticing. Many of the porch railings, window grills, and especially the gates are prominently displayed in front of residences. The subtle archway detail above the door blends nicely with the building’s facade, but it’s a signature Simmons piece.
Philip Simmons, 78 East Bay Street

Stolls Alley
Stolls Alley, between East Bay and Church Streets, is so narrow on the East Bay end that many people miss it all together. There are five separate gates designed forged by Philip Simmons gates along the alley, so a stroll down this shady, hidden spot is highly recommended.
Philip Simmons, 5 Stolls Alley

Philip Simmons, Charleston’s famed wrought iron artist

Philip Simmons

Simmons in his forge on Blake St. Photo: Judy Fairchild

Philip Simmons is a household name among Charleston architecture enthusiasts. As a Lowcountry blacksmith, the renowned artisan spent his life, or 78 years of it, crafting everyday objects like horseshoes, tools, and fireplace pokers — most from his workshop at 30 1/2 Blake Street in downtown Charleston.

Simmons passed away in 2009 at the age of 97 and left his signature everywhere from the Smithsonian to Paris — but especially in Charleston. When he died, the city honored him by tying white ribbons on all of his known works throughout Charleston.

He lived here all his life, and it was on his walks to school that he became intrigued with ironwork, which would change his life. His first apprenticeship with a blacksmith began when he was only 12 years old. His supervisor was the grandson of slaves, and so the skills he learned had been passed down from several generations of African American artisans.

What Simmons is most remembered for are his stunning wrought iron gates and other ornamental work that can be seen throughout Charleston. His gate work began in the early 1940s when he met a businessman named Jack Krawcheck, who commissioned a wrought iron gate for his King Street store. Simmons had to source his materials from scrap iron since the demand for iron during World War II made iron scarce to come by.

Philip Simmons

The original Krawcheck Gate at 313 King Street

But the result was impressive enough for the Krawcheck family to commission more than 30 more iron pieces throughout Simmons’ career. And over the course of the following seven decades, Simmons made a living with his newfound calling, creating over 500 decorative home pieces including iron balconies, window grilles, fences, and gates.

So where can you learn more about Simmons today? His craft continues to be honored in his shop on Blake Street thanks to apprentices and his family — Carlton Simmons (Nephew) and Joseph Pringle (cousin). His home is a museum house with a book shop that opened the year after his passing.

His family and colleagues want to merely fulfill Simmons’ last wish, and that is to make sure his trade is carried on, which is why engineer John Paul Huguley founded the American College of the Building Arts. Simmons was the “inspirational founder,” Huguley told the Post & Courier two years ago. The school restored one of Simmons’ most significant gates, the coiled rattlesnakes at 329 East Bay Street.

The Philip Simmons Foundation also ensures that his legacy lives on via everything from sterling silver jewelry fashioned in shapes inspired Simmons’ memorable works.

But you don’t have to stop in the Blake Street shop or shop for jewelry online to see his handiwork. Take your very own walking tour around the peninsula to behold his works everywhere from the Philip Simmons Garden at 91 Anson Street to the driveway gate of the mansion at 138 Wentworth Street to Simmons’ very first walkway gate at the Krawcheck residence at 313 King Street. Today 313 King houses the gentlemens’ shop Grady Ervin & Co. where the folks are nice enough to direct you to gate behind the store. They also sell a belt that includes this gate design, so shop around while you’re in there! It’s a lovely store.

Philip Simmons

Mr. Simmons in his forge. Photo: Judy Fairchild

We’ll talk more about his works you can find around Charleston over the next few months in upcoming posts dedicated to #wroughtironwednesday and the late, great Philip Simmons.

Best Family Activities in Charleston

family activities in charlestonPlanning a family vacation in Charleston? You’ve made the right choice. Named No. 1 city in the world by Travel + Leisure magazine, this jewel of a city has become a top tourist destination in the United States.

With its reputation for incredible food, pristine beaches, historic buildings, and beautiful parks, you probably know that there is an unending number of things to see and do in the Holy City, but which family-friendly activities should you consider for your next vacation?

To make things easier, we’ve rounded up a list of the best family activities in Charleston that will make your trip unforgettable. Whether you want to get a taste of Colonial history or splash around in the famous Pineapple Fountain, the Holy City is guaranteed to be a hit with the entire family.

Before your family explores the beautiful city of Charleston, make sure to stop by the Visitor Center downtown and pick up a free passport for the kids. They will have a blast collecting stamps at the most popular attractions in the area!

activities in charleston

Beat the Heat at the South Carolina Aquarium  

Charleston summers can get hot, but you can escape the heat by visiting the South Carolina Aquarium. Though it may be small, it is well-curated, and you should expect to spend a couple hours here to see everything it offers visitors.

Along with some great educational exhibits that the entire family will enjoy, the aquarium also has fun hands-on exhibits, including a touch tank for kids and knowledgeable staff members around to answer all of their questions.

Highlights of the South Carolina Aquarium are the albino alligator and the sea turtle rehabilitation center. And, fair warning—the price of admission may seem a little steep to some, but it is completely worth it if your kids love aquatic animals.

family activities in charleston

Photo Credit: Instagram User @explorecml

Explore the Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry

With nine interactive exhibits, there are plenty of ways to play and learn at the Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry. Located in downtown Charleston next to the Visitor’s Center, the museum is another opportunity to cool down during the hot summer days.

Whether your kids want to be a knight or princess in the museum’s two-story Medieval Castle or maybe even a pirate looking for treasure aboard a pirate ship, they are guaranteed to have a blast at the Children’s Museum.

Parents will love watching your children interact with the many hands-on exhibits and see their creative sides blossom in each of the museum’s themed rooms. If you have little ones, this is a nice way to take a break from the more adult activities in Charleston.

family activities in charleston

Photo Credit: Instagram User @charlestoncoastvacations

Swim and Play at Folly Beach County Park

Charleston is known for its beautiful beaches, and your trip isn’t complete unless you’ve been to at least one of them. It can be hard to know which one suits your particular needs.

If you’re going with the entire family, then Folly Beach is a favorite for good reason. Located on the west end of Folly Island, Folly Beach County Park is a wonderful place to take the kiddos for a fun day at the beach. Consider getting a Folly Beach vacation rental to take in the entire island!

At this park, you can rest easy knowing that seasonal lifeguards are present. Restrooms are also available at the park, which can be a rarity at the beach.

Need to wipe off the sand and sea after a day of fun in the sun? There are also outdoor showers on site to clean everybody up before they get into the car!

family activities in charleston

Photo Credit: Instagram User @charlestonfarms

Wander Around the Farmer’s Market

There is nothing quite like the Charleston Farmer’s Market. Voted No. 5 Best Farmer’s Market by Travel + Leisure magazine, the Charleston Farmer’s Market brings in roughly a thousand people each Saturday.

The Market is over 20 years old and has changed significantly over the years. As the Holy City’s tourism industry began to boom, the Market eventually expanded to accommodate the many tourists that visit Charleston each year.

While some farmer’s markets only serve produce from local farmers, the Charleston Farmer’s Market features local artisans as well. Held at Marion Square, you will find beautiful arts and crafts in addition to mouthwatering food and produce.

Live music and performances are always present at the Farmer’s Market, and there are a few fun activities for the kids to partake in as well.  In addition to tasting some delicious samples from local vendors, you can take the kids to nearby Marion Square Park to relax or play on its expansive greenspace.

activities in charleston,fort sumter

Travel Back in Time at Fort Sumter

History buffs from all over the world travel to Charleston for its many historical sites and buildings. When you have children, getting them excited to see some of these historical places can be challenging. Fortunately, visiting Fort Sumter can be an absolute blast for parents and kids alike.

Fort Sumter can only be accessed by boat, which means that you will need to purchase a ferry ticket to get there. Tour boats leave from two docks—at Liberty Square in Downtown Charleston and Patriot’s Point on the Mt. Pleasant side. If you leave from Liberty Square, your family can explore the interesting exhibits at the Fort Sumter Visitor Education Center before you board the ferry.

The boat ride includes a 35-minute narration of the Civil War and Fort Sumter. This may not interest the younger kids much, but they will still enjoy the boat ride nonetheless. If they look closely, they will be able to see local wildlife, including dolphins, manatees, and more.

Fort Sumter has a Junior Ranger program, where kids can pick up an activity booklet onsite and begin an educational adventure to earn their Junior Ranger badge. The knowledgeable staff love getting questions from the kids and will tell you all about the history of South Carolina.

activities in charleston

Splash in the Fountains at Waterfront Park

Located in the French Quarter of Downtown Charleston, the Waterfront Park is a popular destination for both tourists and locals. This gorgeous park not only offers some breathtaking views of the Charleston Harbor and the Cooper River, but it’s also the perfect place to snap some photos.

There are plenty of fountains along the palm-tree lined path of Waterfront Park, including the famous Pineapple Fountain where the kids can get wet and get a break from the heat. The Grand Fountain is another one that the kids are sure to enjoy.

When everyone is splashed out, you can settle under the shade of a giant oak tree or find a sheltered swing to enjoy the breeze. Grab a bite to eat or some gelato ice cream from Belgian Gelato, then head out onto the pier to see a few bottle-nose dolphins swimming in the harbor.

The Waterfront Park is one of Charleston’s most visited parks for a reason. This family-friendly park is meticulously maintained, and we promise that you won’t regret visiting here, even if it may be difficult to grab a good parking spot!

family activities in charleston

Photo Credit: @patriots_point

Walk Through the USS Yorktown

Even if your kids aren’t old enough to appreciate the history of the USS Yorktown, they will love walking through this historic WWII aircraft carrier, which is also the focal point of the Patriots Point Naval and Maritime Museum.

Named after the Battle of Yorktown during the Revolutionary War, the USS Yorktown is one of 24 Essex-class aircraft carriers built during WWII and is now a National Historic Landmark. While parents will find the backstory of the USS Yorktown fascinating, the kids will have a great time exploring the flight deck, seeing the numerous planes, and participating in the museum’s cutting-edge flight simulators.

While the star of the show is, no doubt, the USS Yorktown, the Medal of Honor Museum inside the ship is a well-curated collection. This museum recognizes Medal of Honor recipients from the Civil War up to the present day and tells the stories of the men and women who have received the nation’s highest military honor. As it is the only museum in the nation that honors these esteemed recipients, it is a must-see on your Charleston vacation.

family activities in charleston

Relax on the Beaches of the Isle of Palms

With miles of beautiful beaches and an endless amount of family-friendly activities, the barrier island of the Isle of Palms is a popular destination for those who want a beach vacation getaway.

Located roughly 12 miles from downtown Charleston, the Isle of Palms is a quaint seaside town that has so much to offer active families. Many choose to get a vacation rental on the Isle of Palms to enjoy the stunning oceanfront views and be close to nearby amenities, including golf courses, tennis courts, biking and walking trails, and more.

Whether your family loves getting out and being active or relaxing on the beach, then you will find no better place to vacation than the Isle of Palms. Here, you can paddleboard on the waterway, enjoy a casual meal or let the kids play on beachfront playground at the county park.

activities in charleston

Visit Magnolia Plantation

A trip to one of Charleston’s historical plantations is a staple option for many families. If you’re hesitant to tour a plantation, rest assured that there is plenty of fun available at Magnolia Plantation and Gardens.

Founded in 1676, the Magnolia Plantation is not only rich with history but also possessed a distinctive beauty. These Romantic-style gardens have flowers that are in bloom year-round so that you are guaranteed to experience the full beauty of Magnolia Plantation.

While you’re there, don’t forget to take the rice field boat tour that glides along Magnolia’s old flooded rice fields. Rice is no longer grown on the premises, but there is plenty of engaging nature to enjoy, including gators, egrets, and frogs.

The children will also love the petting zoo, which has domesticated creatures that are native to the Lowcountry. Their animal adventures don’t have to stop at the petting zoo. The Zoo & Nature Center has numerous exhibits for them to experience, including a reptile house that features snakes, lizards, and even venomous snakes.

family Activities in Charleston

Charleston—Fun for the Entire Family!

If you’re looking for a vacation that is jam-packed with family-friendly activities, then Charleston is the place to be. Well-maintained parks, miles of beaches, delicious cuisine, and interactive history exhibits make the Holy City one of the best places to visit any time of the year.

Charleston Sweetgrass Baskets and Weavers

You’ve seen them — African-American women, men, and children sitting on corners of the City Market, or at Saint Michael’s Church on Broad and Meeting streets, or along Highway 17. No matter the season, 100-degree sun be damned, these folks remain steadfastly focused on their craft: sweetgrass baskets.
Sweetgrass baskets
An intricate work of art, the sweetgrass basket is a sought-after piece of memorabilia. Tourists visiting the Lowcountry see the baskets woven before their own eyes and are given a glimpse of the history behind them. It’s impossible to come away thinking these sweet-smelling masterpieces (think fresh hay) are anything less than special.

The History

The sweetgrass basket wasn’t always a piece of art – they were made out of necessity. Today, the folks you see crafting them are Gullah, descendants of slaves taken from West Africa and brought to the coast of South Carolina and Georgia in the 1700s to work on plantations. In addition to free labor, plantation owners gained a wealth of knowledge and skills, such as basketry.

The Materials

So what are the baskets made from? Nowadays, sweetgrass. But the skill was honed in the early days using marsh grass, or also known as bulrush. Using the needly marsh grass, slaves were able to coil extremely sturdy work baskets that came to be known as fanners. Fanners were used in the rice fields for winnowing, the process of tossing hulls about so that the chaff could separate from the rice. Work baskets also held veggies, shellfish, and cotton.

It was in the early 1900s that sweetgrass was employed to weave with, in addition to pine needles and palmetto fronds, which added flexibility and bend to the creations and allowed for more intricate designs, such as loops.

The Evolution of a Basket

You can find sweetgrass grown wild in moist, sandy soils near the sea, hence the aplenty supply in the Lowcountry. In the fall, the grass is a beautiful purple before fading to white.

When it’s time to collect the grass, you simply grab the green grass by the handful, with one foot on the root, and pull it from the ground. Then it’s time to lay the grass out in the sun to dry for three to five days, which is when it shrinks and becomes a more beige color.

Sweetgrass baskets

On average, a good-sized basket takes 10 hours to weave, not including the time it takes to source and dry the materials. The price on a larger piece? About $350, which isn’t a lot considering the labor that went into creating it. You can also find simpler designs for $40, or elaborate ones for thousands. However if you’re really on a budget, you can always also find a sweetgrass rose, which are not only below $5 but also simply gorgeous little works of art — just like the baskets.

Hands-On

To learn more about this incredible tradition passed down through so many generations and to have a chance to weave a basket yourself, follow basket maker Sarah Edwards-Hammond on Facebook. She frequently conducts basket classes for both adults and children.

Where have you spotted sweetgrass weavers in the Lowcountry?

Charleston’s Cobblestone Streets, Stepping Back in Time

Charleston’s cobblestone streets are just one of her many charms.  Though there are only eight left now, these historic streets were once much more common. It’s believed that the peninsula once contained over ten miles of cobblestone ways. Thankfully our streets now afford us a more smooth ride for the most part, but we’re still proud of the history the endearing cobblestones hold.

Charleston’s Cobblestone Streets

Here are a few facts you may not have known about the Holy City’s cobblestone streets:

So how did cobblestones get here in the first place? When the city was first settled, ships would use the stones as weights, weighing the boats down when they didn’t have enough cargo. Once the ships were emptied, off came the stones to make room for exported goods. Naturally, the smooth stones collected onto the wharves, or wharfs.

Anyone who has ever driven down a cobblestone street knows the bumpiness of the ride all too well. But the stones were a more sensible option than Charleston’s once dirt-based, muddy streets. The smoothness of the cobblestones made streets easier to navigate for the transportation mode of the colonial days: horse-and-carriages, and the addition of stones as streets were preferable to what you can imagine — based on the state of the peninsula now when it rains — were streets filled with mud and water when it rained.

Cobblestone streets, charleston sc

Chalmers Street, nestled in the French Quarter, is definitely the most well-known, and photographed, cobblestone street in the city. It’s also long been called Labor Lane, as rumor has it that way-back-when, a ride on the rockiest of roads caused nine-month-pregnant women to go into labor.

Another well-known cobblestone street in the city is called Adger’s Wharf, which is located South of Broad. Running from East Bay Street straight to the water, the bumpy road was a busy dock, originally called Magwood’s Wharf. But its current name came from a 19th-century Irish merchant named James Adger II who came to Charleston via New York in 1802 as a cotton buyer. He later opened a hardware store and established the Adger Line and became one of the country’s wealthiest men. Today Adger’s Wharf makes for a perfectly lovely shortcut to the harbor — and, if you like, to Waterfront Park — from East Bay.

At the bottom of Broad Street, near the Exchange Building, lies Gillon Street, another example of early cobblestone street paving in Charleston. It’s named after Alexander Gillon, who was a famous commodore of the navy of SC during the Revolutionary War. Later on, he founded the Charleston Chamber of Commerce, which today is the oldest Chamber of Commerce in America.

A slightly more secret cobblestone-filled street is Longitude Lane, though it’s actually more of an alley. It’s a beautiful path that leads to a narrow street with a handful of old single-family houses you’ll instantly picture yourself living in — because who is lucky enough to live on sweet little streets such as these?

Charleston Market Statistics through April 2017

Charleston Market Statistics through April 2017

The employment landscape and wages have both improved over the last few years, allowing for more people to participate in the home-buying process. When the economy is in good working order, as it is now, it creates opportunities in residential real estate, and right now is a potentially lucrative time to sell a home. Houses that show well and are priced correctly have been selling quickly, often at higher prices than asking. New listings were down 2.6% and inventory shrank 16.8% while median sales price was up 3.1%.

 Although there is a mounting amount of buyer competition during the annual spring market cycle, buyer demand has not abated, nor is it expected to in the immediate future unless something unpredictable occurs. While strong demand is generally considered a good problem to have, it creates an affordability issue for some buyers, especially first-time buyers. And yet, prices will continue to rise amidst strong demand.

Charleston Market Statistics through April 2017

5 new Charleston restaurants, Spring 2017

new charleston restaurants

Photo Credit: Instagram User @sorghumsalt

With Charleston being a foodie destination with a reputation that gets glossier with every new restaurant opening, it’s easy to get overwhelmed with what to try next. We’ve taken the liberty of sifting through all the new restaurants in Charleston this spring and compiling a list of those serving up grub worth your dough.

Sorghum & Salt, 186 Coming Street Downtown

Sorghum & Salt opened in April, and this spot has already racked up a reputation among locals – not bad for a restaurant in its infancy.The menu changes, but as of now you can stop in and choose from their Garden and Grains, Meat and Fish, or Larger Plates menus, all of which are reasonably priced. We can’t vouch for everything, but you can rest assured that the Collard Green Tagliatelle with Shrimp Sausage – Calabrian Chili – Collards and Bread Crumbs — phew, that’s a mouthful, in more ways than one — is a meal to remember.

new charleston restaurants

Photo Credit: Instagram User @rodneyscottsbbq

Rodney Scott’s BBQ, 1011 King Street Downtown

If you haven’t been here yet, you’re doing yourself no favors. Scott’s slow-pulled pork, chicken, and ribs alone will make you moan (that reaction is actually their claim to fame) but you have to also try the fried catfish sandwich — not to mention the fixings. Take your pick of fresh-cut fries, cornbread, hushpuppies, cole slaw, potato salad, baked beans, mac ‘n’ cheese, greens, perlo rice, and, yes, of course, grits.

Benny Ravello’s, 520 King Street Downtown

Love the Mt. Pleasant Benny Palmetto’s? Then you’ll also dig the new downtown sister restaurant Benny Ravello’s, which hit King Street in mid-April. Serving up slices bigger than your hand, Benny’s is in the former George Loan Co. pawn shop and has been operating off the same menu as its predecessor — except this time no beer and wine. But you’ll forget all about your thirst for alcohol once you get a taste of some of the best pie in town.

new charleston restaurants

Photo Credit: Instagram User @workshopchs

Workshop Charleston, 1503 King Street Downtown

The hottest of hot spots right now is Workshop — an upscale food court that, after less than a month in business, is the talk of the town already. Workshop boasts minimalist decor and maximum flavor. Choose food from Pink Bellies (featuring Thai Phi’s Animal Style Burger), JD Loves Cheese (coming to you from Cynthia Wong, the baker over at Butcher & Bee), or Kite Noodles (Korean food from Jonathan Ory). John Lewis of Lewis BBQ has also taken up residence with his Tex/Mex concept called Juan Luis. There’s also pizza by Slice Co. and Bad Wolf Coffee (also from Ory). The food court seats 100, so grab a seat soon to test the waters for yourself.

Martha Lou’s No. 2, 2000-Q McMillan Ave North Charleston

Morrison Street’s soul food institution Martha Lou’s has long been a favorite among locals, but a mention by the New York Times in 2011 gave the restaurant an extra, and welcomed, boost. In April, the 87-year-old proprietor opened a second locale in North Charleston, officially called Martha Lou’s No. 2 Love and Happiness Catering, where they’re serving all the faves — fried chicken, mac ‘n’ cheese, green beans — every day of the week.

What new Charleston restaurant has caught your attention?

An Insider’s Guide to Spoleto: One of The Country’s Top Performing Arts Festivals

Spoleto

Photo Credit: Instagram User @spoletofestivalusa

Each spring, thousands visit the city of Charleston to partake in the Spoleto Festival USA, one of America’s biggest performing arts festivals. For 17 days and nights, this festival delights the Holy City with the best artistic performances with more than 150 performers from around the world.

Opera, theater, dance, jazz—the Spoleto Festival USA has it all, and the lineup is more diverse than ever in its 41st year. From highly-anticipated fan favorites to up-and-coming productions, this year promises to be even better than the last, which is incredible, considering that last year’s sales were record-breaking.

If you plan to attend this year’s festivities, then understanding the full vision of the event is essential. Spoleto’s rich history and dedication to the arts are inspiring and allow you to fully appreciate the talented performances that come to town every year.

In this insider’s guide, we will give you the scoop on the history of the Spoleto Festival USA and highlight some of the must-see premieres this year. Whether you are a Charleston local or an out-of-town attendee, consider this your go-to guide for festival this year.

The History of Spoleto Festival USA

Since 1977, the Spoleto Festival USA has been captivating audiences in Charleston and enriching an already vibrant community. First founded by Pulitzer-winning composer Gian Carlo Menotti, the three-week event was originally intended to be an American counterpart to the Festival of Two Worlds in the small town of Spoleto, Italy.

SpoletoWhy Charleston?

The founders wanted a city that would mimic the small-town charm of Spoleto, Italy, while also providing enough theaters and accommodations to host the festival. They found their ideal location in Charleston, a city that is known for its picturesque neighborhoods and historic charm.

The Holy City’s abundance of churches, theaters, and early dedication to the performing arts made it the perfect setting for the festival. In addition, the city’s vibrant community and small-town atmosphere were similar to the small Italian town, which further cemented the founder’s decision to make Charleston the home of the festival.

The Mission of the Spoleto Festival

Since its beginning in 1977, the Spoleto Festival has been committed to showcasing only the best artistic performances and supporting young artists, helping them foster their passion for the arts in all forms. It also brings a significant impact on Charleston’s economy and regularly invests in both local businesses and the community.

Dedication to Young Artists

Spoleto has supported young artists since its inception and encourages them to pair up with more experienced performers so that they can learn new skills. The festival offers many exciting opportunities for blossoming artists to advance their careers, including auditioning for the seat in the Spoleto Festival Orchestra or the Westminster Choir.

Giving Back to the Local Community

Spoleto’s mission also gives back to the city that it has called home for over 40 years. Though the event brings international fame and economic success, the festival also directly invests in the local community.

Spoleto has not only played a key role in preserving historical landmarks, such as the Dock Street Theatre and the Middleton-Pinckney House, but it also continues to educate the local community through programs that help inspire a deeper appreciation for the performing arts.  Most notably, their Open Stage Door program distributes complimentary tickets to community-based organizations so that they may be part of the Spoleto experience.

Spoleto

photo courtesy of instagram user @spoletofestivalusa

Historical Charleston Theatres, Churches, and Event Spaces

Charleston boasts many elegant theatres and churches that serve as the venues for the 17-day festival. These prominent event spaces not only provide the lowcountry with a place to view world-class performances but, also offer a glimpse into the history of Charleston.

Here is a list of beloved Spoleto venues and some notable performances taking place around town.

Charleston Gaillard Center

The recently renovated Charleston Gaillard Center will once again host Spoleto’s featured opera this year, an extravagant production of Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin. Dates for the performance are May 26 and June 1, 4, 8.

The Gaillard Center will also present the Westminster Choir, Charleston Symphony Orchestra Chorus, and the Spoleto Festival USA Orchestra’s performance of Mozart’s Great Mass.

Last, don’t miss a special, one-night-only performance by American roots musician Rhiannon Giddens on June 9th at Gaillard Center!

Cathedral Church of St. Luke and St. Paul

Conducted by Joe Miller, the Westminster Choir performs at the Cathedral Church of St. Luke and St. Paul. This fan favorite is considered one of the most-loved traditions of the festival.

College of Charleston Cistern Yard

Performances at the College of Charleston Cistern Yard this year include Terrance Blanchard, featuring the E-Collective, on June 3rd for a one-night only performance. Multi-Grammy winner Terry Blanchard and the E-Collective create a perfect ensemble that combines jazz, funk, rock, R&B, and blues music.

Spoleto

Photo Credit: Instagram User @spoletofestivalusa

College of Charleston Sottile Theatre

Israeli dance company L-E-V, is set to perform OCD Love at the College of Charleston Sottile Theatre on June 2, 3, and 4. Led by choreographers Sharon Eyal and Gai Behar, the production explores love through the lens of obsessive compulsive disorders.

Monchichi, the duet that blends hip-hop with contemporary dance, will also be performing at Sottile Theatre on May 26-28.

Dock Street Theatre

The historic Dock Street Theatre will host the Druid production of Waiting for Godot, which begins on May 25. It will also host the American premiere of Antonio Vivaldi’s opera Farnace, which begins May 27.

Spoleto

photo courtesy of instagram user @spoletofestivalusa

Notable Premieres and Fan Favorites

From the very beginning, Spoleto has encouraged artists from all backgrounds and ages to participate and explore their creativity to its fullest. As a result, each year brings a remarkably diverse lineup that relies on both traditional and contemporary performances to delight audiences.

Notable Premieres

Those who attend Spoleto regularly will recognize a few reoccurring performances, but there is always excitement surrounding new premieres. If you are attending the event this year, here are the anticipated performances premiering at Spoleto:

Ayodele Casel

New York tapper Ayodele Casel’s world premiere, While I Have the Floor, explores identity, language, communication, and artistic legacy. Casel will also be participating in the popular “Conversations With” program, an intimate conversation with participating artists who open up about their creative processes and the experience at Spoleto.

Cinema and Sound

Fans will welcome back acclaimed pianist Stephen Prutsman, who performs the original scores for the world premiere of Cinema and Sound. The program blends silent film and a live soundtrack for a particularly innovative performance at the Woolfe Street Playhouse.

Farnace

The U.S. premiere of Antonio Vivaldi’s most popular 18th-century opera, Farnace, is a highly-anticipated performance this year. Produced by Garry Hynes, the mythical Roman war drama will star Anthony Roth Costanzo, a legendary countertenor.

Quartett

An opera full of dark comedy and seduction, the U.S. premiere of Royal Opera House’s Quartett will be sure to captivate audiences. Composed by Luca Francesconi, conducted by John Kennedy, and directed by John Fulljames, you won’t want to miss this performance at the Memminger Auditorium.

Fan Favorites

Over the years, many regular attendees of Spoleto have their favorites events that they look forward to attending every year. Last year’s Porgy and Bess was an enormous hit in Charleston and was a signature performance of the 40th anniversary of Spoleto.

Performances aside, there are also activities and events that Spoleto fans love to attend. Here are other favorites that will please all ages and backgrounds:

Conversations With

The “Conversation With” program gives audiences a chance to hear from the visiting artists and get an inside glimpse into their creative thought processes. The artists will be interviewed by CBS correspondent Martha Teichner, and each presentation lasts for approximately an hour. Fans will get to hear from their favorite artists, including director Garry Hynes and pianist Stephen Prutsman.

The sessions are free as long as attendees register in advance.

Master Classes

Fans of Spoleto not only get to watch artistic performances, but they can join in themselves.  With the “Master Classes” program, the performing artists teach both experienced and beginners dancers the art of their craft.

This year’s classes are being led by Company Wang Ramirez, L-E-V, Company Class with Gallim Dance, and Hillel Kogan. Get tickets while you can!

Jazz Talks

Held in the Simons Center Recital Hall at College of Charleston, Jazz Talks gives audiences the chance to listen to an intimate conversation between notable jazz musicians. This year’s discussions will include the following:

Fud at 100: A Centennial Celebration:  Charleston mayor John Tecklenburg discusses the legacy of his great-uncle Joseph “Fud” Livingston alongside historian Karen Chandler and music critic Larry Blumenfeld on May 28.

Trumpeting Truth – A Conversation with Terence Blanchard: Larry Blumenfeld will return to discuss arts, advocacy, and social justice issues with Grammy-winning trumpeter and composer Terence Blanchard.

These events are free if you register in advance.

Spoleto Finale at Middleton Place

Of course, no one should miss Spoleto’s grand finale across the Ashley River at the historic Middleton Place. Attendants will get access to the full lineup of local and regional bands, headlined by breakout band The Revivalists. Additionally, ticket holders will also get to explore the beautiful gardens and refined lodgings of one of Charleston’s treasured National Historic Landmarks.

Spoleto

The Piccolo Spoleto Festival

Charleston’s existing dedication to the performing arts is one of the reasons why Spoleto Festival USA founders chose the city to host this yearly event. It isn’t surprising, then, that the Piccolo Spoleto was created to offer even more cultural opportunities.

What Is Piccolo Spoleto?

In 1979, Mayor Joseph P. Riley, Jr. launched the Piccolo Spoleto Festival to highlight Charleston’s local performing artists. While the main venues feature artists on a national and international level, this series gives attention to regional, less known artists. Plus, most of the events are free and family-friendly!

The festival runs concurrently with its parent event, which means that everyone can easily fit some of these popular Piccolo events into their schedule.

Piccolo Fringe

Are you in the mood for some improv? This comedy extravaganza is held each year at Theatre 99 on Meeting Street and features top comedic artists with original performances. Although most Piccolo events are family-friendly, this one is more suited toward adults.

Piccolo Fiction Spotlight

Are you a fan of the written word? The Piccolo Fiction Spotlight invites South Carolina writers to submit their brief short stories for a chance to be published in the Charleston City Paper, broadcast on S.C. Public Radio, and be read in the historic Charleston Music Hall.

The Spotlight Concert Series

The 13-performance program features classical arrangements by The Charleston Renaissance Ensemble, Chamber Music Charleston, and the Charleston Piano Trio with violist Miles Hoffman.

The Sundown Poetry Series

One of the oldest Piccolo Festival series, the Sundown Poetry Series offers local and regional poets the opportunity to gather for free evening readings. After the readings, many authors stay for a Q & A sessions to discuss their work. This event traditionally takes place at Dock Street Courtyard on Church Street.

Ready for Spoleto Festival USA?

If you happen to be in Charleston during the festival, then you should definitely explore some of the amazing artistic performances happening in the Holy City this spring. With over 160 ticketed events, there is something for everyone at Spoleto to enjoy.

67 Warren Street, a downtown Queen Anne renovation

67 Warren Street, Downtown Charleston

67 Warren Street, Downtown Charleston

This Luxurious Queen Anne style home, built in 1878, has undergone a massive renovation throughout the entirety of the home. This charming property features a completely redesigned kitchen, updated bathrooms, fireplaces, HVAC, ceiling fans, electrical wiring, plumbing, new decks, new painting and much more. The main house features a formal living room, formal traditional dining room, as well as a den and a third floor bonus room. The rear of the home consists of TWO Income-Generating, One bed/One bath apartments, both with kitchens, separate entrances & shared washer/dryer. This home ALSO includes an unfinished basement, uncommon in downtown Charleston. This prime location is walking distance to Upper King Street, MUSC, CofC, and Colonial Lake. Off-street parking for 3 cars. Contact Frank Taylor for more information.

line