About dunes properties of Charleston

dunes properties of Charleston is a real estate, vacation rental and property management company representing the Lowcountry with almost 80 exclusive Charleston beach vacation rental properties, 70 real estate agents and employees, four full-service offices. Nobody knows the Charleston Coast better.

Isle of Palms Office

1400 Palm Boulevard
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
843.886.5600

Real Estate Inquiries:
realestate@dunesproperties.com
Vacation Rental Inquiries:
vacations@dunesproperties.com


Folly Beach Office

31 Center Street
Folly Beach, SC 29439
843.588.3800

Real Estate Inquiries:
realestate@dunesproperties.com
Vacation Rental Inquiries:
vacations@dunesproperties.com


The Real Estate Studio

214 King Street
Charleston, SC 29401
843.722.5618

Real Estate Inquiries:
realestate@dunesproperties.com
Vacation Rental Inquiries:
vacations@dunesproperties.com


Kiawah Seabrook Office

1887 Andell Bluff Boulevard
Johns Island, SC 29455
843.768.9800

Real Estate Inquiries:
realestate@dunesproperties.com
Vacation Rental Inquiries:
vacations@dunesproperties.com


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Category: Mt. Pleasant

Plantations Near Charleston, A Stroll Through History

Plantations Near Charleston

The city of Charleston is bursting with culture and history that begs to be explored, but if you venture a little farther outside of Charleston, you’ll unlock an essential piece of Lowcountry history. The plantations near Charleston offer more than lush gardens and stunning architecture. They provide visitors a glimpse into the South’s complicated past, in addition to the old customs and traditions of the Lowcountry.

Whether you’re lucky enough to call Charleston home or you’re merely visiting for a few days, meandering through the Lowcountry’s famous plantations is a must. Take a stroll through the following plantations to experience their undeniable beauty and get a unique look into the intricate history of the South.

Plantations Near Charleston

Magnolia Plantation

As one of the oldest plantations in the South, the Magnolia Plantation and Gardens should not be missed. Founded in 1676 by Thomas and Ann Drayton, this majestic and historical landmark has been occupied by the same family for over 300 years and has witnessed many notable moments in the history of the United States.

However, the plantation’s history isn’t the only thing that draws thousands of tourists to Magnolia each year. The gardens have a rich history of their own, and their luscious beauty makes the Magnolia Plantation one of the top wedding destinations in America.

History of Magnolia Plantation

In 1676, Thomas Drayton and his wife Ann traveled from Barbados to make a life in the new English colony of Charles Towne (later to become Charleston). They built the Magnolia Plantation and a small garden along the banks of the Ashley River, which provided them with immense wealth through the cultivation of rice.

When you take a guided tour of the plantation, you will hear how African Americans brought rice with them to the Lowcountry, transforming the agriculture and economy of Charleston. There are also four slave cabins, where African American slaves lived and worked on the plantation during this time.

The Magnolia Plantation has withstood many difficult times and witnessed prominent events in America’s history. During the Revolutionary War, the Drayton sons would fight as soldiers against the British. Later, the family would undergo hard times when the Civil War broke out and threatened the future of the plantation.

By opening Magnolia Plantation and Gardens to the public in 1870, the Drayton family was able to preserve the plantation and their livelihood.

The Romantic Magnolia Gardens

As the oldest and one of the most famous gardens in America, the Magnolia Gardens are teeming with stunning horticulture. Explore over 100 acres of Romantic-style gardens that offer something special no matter what time of the year you visit.

You can thank Reverend John Grimké Drayton for much of the beauty seen in the Magnolia Gardens today. To make his wife feel more at home after relocating from Philadelphia, he introduced the first azaleas in America and planted the first outdoor variety of camellias as well.

His ministerial career motivated him to recreate the Garden of Eden, and anyone who tours these gardens can see that he did a spectacular job. With its unrivaled beauty and extensive collection of native flora, the gardens are largely what saved the Magnolia Plantation from financial ruin.

Additional Attractions and Tours

After exploring the Drayton house and the gardens, nature-lovers can take a boat or train tour that takes them through the cypress wetland habitat and the location of the old rice fields. On these tours, you’ll get to see plenty of wildlife that call the beautiful Magnolia Plantation home.

In addition to these tours, don’t forget to take the kids to the plantation’s petting zoo and nature center. The zoo contains both domesticated and wild creatures, many of which are native to the state, including the gray fox, beaver and bobcat.

Plantations Near Charleston

Middleton Place

If you’re looking for the perfect combination of natural wildlife and history, Middleton Place should be on your list of places to visit in Charleston. Nestled on the banks of the Ashley River, Middleton Place is home to America’s Oldest Landscaped Gardens, abundant wildlife and historic plantation stables.

It’s easy to feel like you’ve been transported back in time at Middleton Place. Costumed craftspeople work on-site, and heritage animal breeds are present in the stable yards. Handcrafted carriages transport visitors around the carefully preserved plantation, providing an authentic experience.

History of Middleton Place

Built in 1705, Henry Middleton came into possession of the house through his marriage to Mary Williams in 1741. Since then, the plantation has remained under the same stewardship for 320 years.

From colonial times to the years following the Civil War, the Middleton family have played significant roles in American history. Many family members were influential political figures, beginning with Henry Middleton, who was the second president of the First Continental Congress. His son Arthur was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and Arthur’s son was the governor of South Carolina and the Minister Plenipotentiary to Russia.

William Middleton, an ardent secessionist, signed South Carolina’s Ordinance of Secession in 1860. In 1865, the plantation was occupied by Union troops, who burned the main house and northern wing. William lacked the funds for major restorations, and the small restorations that he did manage were upset by the Charleston Earthquake in 1886.

The following generations dedicated themselves to restoring the plantation and gardens to their original splendor. In the 1920s, the family opened the gardens to the public, and the plantation was added to the National Register of Historic Places. It officially became a National Historic Landmark District in the 1970s.

Life at Middleton Place

The House Museum and Eliza’s House should not be missed during your stroll on the plantation. Both places give visitors a special glimpse into the lives of the Middleton family, the freedmen who served them, and the many enslaved people who worked on the plantation.

The House Museum includes fascinating artifacts donated by the Middletons, including paintings, books, furniture and documents that date back to the 1740s. The house itself is a sight to see, as it is the only portion of the plantation that retains its original structure.

Eliza’s House is a freedmen’s dwelling that depicts the stories of over seven generations of slaves who occupied the plantation’s grounds up until the Civil War. Named after its last occupant, Eliza’s House offers tours to discuss the domestic life of slaves and freed people, in addition to their laborious work out in the rice fields.

Touring the Grounds and Gardens

To experience the beauty and functionality of Middleton Place, seeing the grounds and famous gardens are a must. The plantation’s plentiful land gives visitors the chance to imagine how Middleton Place functioned during the 18th and 19th century. In fact, many of the animal breeds you see at the plantation today were the same ones used to work the land centuries ago.

You can also take a self-guided tour through America’s Oldest Landscaped Gardens, which contains centuries-old camellias, azaleas, magnolias and other flora that cover the beautiful grounds.

Plantations Near Charleston

Drayton Hall

Situated on the Ashley River about 15 miles south of Charleston, Drayton Hall is the oldest preserved plantation in America, retaining nearly all its original structure and historic landscape.  Built in the 1740s, the stunning George Palladian plantation also features a Memorial Arch that represents one of the oldest documented African American cemeteries in the country.

Drayton Hall also happens to be located just down the road from the Magnolia Plantation, making it easy to visit both in a single day if you are feeling ambitious. Whether you dedicate a full day or a half-day, Drayton Hall is a must for those who want to unlock a major piece of African-American and Lowcountry history.

History of Drayton Hall

As the third son in the family, John Drayton knew that inheriting his birthplace at Magnolia Plantations wasn’t likely. The 37-year-old widower decided to purchase property along the scenic Ashley River in the 1730s, where he constructed an elite mansion during the late 1740s.

This architectural masterpiece was inspired by the Renaissance influences of Andrea Palladio and sits on over 630 acres of beautifully landscaped grounds. Drayton Hall is the only plantation that wasn’t destroyed during the Revolutionary War, making it a rare gem of the South.

Drayton Hall served as the hub for John Drayton’s enormous plantation empire. He owned over 100 plantations that spanned across South Carolina and Georgia, where thousands of slaves grew rice, cotton and indigo, as well as mining for phosphate.

The profits generated from the phosphate mining largely contributed to the Drayton’s ability to recover from the Civil War. Drayton Hall passed through seven generations of the Drayton family and was acquired by the National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1974. In 1977, it was opened to the public, and many of the Drayton family artifacts can be seen by all.

The African-American Cemetery

In addition to touring the stunning Drayton mansion, the plantation is also home to one of the oldest documented African-American cemeteries in the nation. Dating back to about 1790, the cemetery serves as the final resting place for over 40 people, both freed and enslaved. Some of the graves are named, but most are unknown.

Although touring the cemetery can be a heavy undertaking, it is a necessary stop if you want a true plantation experience. The cemetery grounds have been left in a natural state to comply with the wishes of Richmond Bowens, whose ancestors were enslaved at Drayton Hall. The cemetery and the plantation itself has largely remained unaltered, giving visitors a sense that they have truly stepped back in time.

Plantations Near Charleston

Boone Hall

Venture through the beautiful Spanish-moss-draped live oaks and gorgeous gardens of Boone Hall, and you’ll understand why it’s the most photographed plantation in the country. Located in Mount Pleasant (roughly 10 miles away from Charleston), Boone Hall is also the oldest operating plantation in the Lowcountry and has a thriving modern market.

The enchanting grounds of Boone Hall attract thousands of visitors each year, not only for its spectacular beauty and year-round activities, but also its rich history. Boone Hall’s enthralling exhibits and tours featuring Gullah culture and black history are the best of any American plantation.

History of Boone Hall

Boone Hall Plantation was founded in 1681 when Theophilus Patey was granted 470 acres on Wampacheeoone Creek, otherwise known Boone Hall Creek. It is believed that Patey gave his daughter Elizabeth and her husband Major John Boone about 400 acres as a wedding gift.

John Boone was one of the original settlers of the South Carolina colony and held several prestigious positions, including tax assessor and highway commissioner. The exact date of his death is unknown, but the will he created in 1711 left a third of the estate to his wife and divided the rest divided amongst his five children.

The plantation remained in the Boone family until 1811, when the property was sold to Thomas A. Vardell for $12,000. Boone Hall would have many owners, some of them leaving lasting impressions on the plantation.

When Henry and John Horlbeck came into possession of Boone Hall in 1817, the brothers would begin planting the famous Avenue of Oaks. The brothers were in the brick business, and many buildings in downtown Charleston feature their bricks, including Stephen’s Episcopal Church and St John’s Lutheran Church.

Boone Hall was purchased by Harris and Nancy McRae in 1955 and opened to the public in 1959. Now owned by William McRae, the historic grounds of the plantation can be toured by the public, while the other half of the plantation is used to produce crops such as strawberries, peaches, tomatoes and more.

Gullah Culture and Black History

What sets Boone Hall apart from other plantations is its amazing exhibits and performances featuring Gullah culture and black history.

Their Black History in America exhibit offers visitors the chance to take in educational and entertaining performances that take place in the nine original slave cabins, each built between 1790 and 1810.

Boone Hall is also the only plantation to feature live presentations from contemporary Gullah people who share their unique story and culture with visitors. Taking in a performance at the Gullah Theater is an experience that you won’t soon forget.

Boone Hall Farms Market and U-Pick Operations

Boone Hall has been providing crops and produce for the Lowcountry since the 17th century when John Boone first inherited the land, making it the oldest operating plantation in the nation.  Their continued success has allowed them to establish Boone Hall Farms Market, which officially opened in 2006, and the Boone Hall Farms U-Pick fields.

Boone Hall Farms Market features reasonably priced produce that is always fresh and local. Taking part in the U-Pick fields is a fun activity that you can do with the entire family, and you’ll take home a juicy basket of produce that you harvested in these historic farm.

The plantations surrounding Charleston, SC offer stately, historic homes, lush gardens, and an abundance of learning opportunities about early American life. If you’re planning a trip to Charleston, visit a historic plantation site for a rewarding experience that your whole family will enjoy.

Charleston Market Statistics through April 2017

Charleston Market Statistics through April 2017

The employment landscape and wages have both improved over the last few years, allowing for more people to participate in the home-buying process. When the economy is in good working order, as it is now, it creates opportunities in residential real estate, and right now is a potentially lucrative time to sell a home. Houses that show well and are priced correctly have been selling quickly, often at higher prices than asking. New listings were down 2.6% and inventory shrank 16.8% while median sales price was up 3.1%.

 Although there is a mounting amount of buyer competition during the annual spring market cycle, buyer demand has not abated, nor is it expected to in the immediate future unless something unpredictable occurs. While strong demand is generally considered a good problem to have, it creates an affordability issue for some buyers, especially first-time buyers. And yet, prices will continue to rise amidst strong demand.

Charleston Market Statistics through April 2017

Places to Grab a Cup of Coffee in Charleston

Coffee — for most of us it’s an everyday necessity, so where can you find the best cup of coffee in Charleston? Whether you need the perfect place for meeting with your real estate agent, need caffeine on the go, a place to plug in your laptop, or a quiet corner for reading, Charleston’s variety of local coffee houses has you covered — and caffeinated! Here are a few of our favorite neighborhood spots.

Collective Coffee, Mount Pleasant

Coffee in Charleston, Collective Coffee Co

Photo Credit: Instagram User @collectivecoffeeco

This upscale, hipster coffee shop is pretty cool indeed with its loft-like, airy space and tasty breakfast (pimento cheese biscuit is life-changing) and snack (avocado toast) items. We love the friendly service here at Collective Coffee along with the ample outdoor seating, community table, comfy corner seating, and plentiful parking, assuring that you and whoever you’re meeting up with will have plenty of places to perch your coffee cups and your cars. Not the cheapest place but they do take pride in preparing your lattes, we can assure you. They’re delicious. The wifi is free, and laptops are welcome here.

Orange Spot, Park Circle North Charleston

For the most adorable coffee experience, head to Park Circle. Orange Spot is nestled in a cute little house and consists of two rooms with plenty of tables, power outlets, cushioned seats, and sunlight. A spacious backyard patio means they can put on events, like mini markets and art openings, since they line their walls with local art. Wifi? Yep, and it’s free. Pro tip: get the the Cha Yen.

Classic Coffee, Avondale, West Ashley

Coffee in Charleston, Classic Coffee Avondale

Photo Credit: Instagram User @classiccoffeecharleston

Avondale residents love strolling on foot over to Classic Coffee for their caffeine fix, and it’s perfect for all kinds of situations. There are couches that make for cozy book-reading nooks, plus outdoor tables, a bar with bar stools, and several inside tables for all your meeting-up purposes. We also love their quiches, which come from nearby Wildflour Pastry, in-house roasted coffee, and fruit smoothies. Parking is a pain at times, though, be ye warned.

Normandy Farm, South Windermere, West Ashley

If you really want to feel fancy and French when you hit the coffee shop, make Normandy your new favorite. Visions and smells of fresh-baked breads, tarts, cakes, pies, and more will have you drooling, but the prices will make you stop in your tracks. Normandy, a light-filled space, is the most affordable coffee shop in Charleston — its pour-it-yourself in-house roasted coffee is only a buck-fifty. The only downside of this place is that the bathrooms are in the back, meaning you have to walk through the kitchen to get there. If you’re having lots of coffee, this can make you feel a bit self-conscious, but, really, they don’t mind at all. Oh and there’s free wifi.

 Kudu Coffee and Craft Beer

Coffee in Charleston, Kudu Coffee

Photo Credit: Instagram User @kuduchs

Kudu discourages folks from working on computers by denying guests their wifi password. So save Kudu for those days when you want to meet up with people (friends or clients) or you simply want to sit in their lovely courtyard and enjoy a book al fresco style. They serve coffee by the cafetiere and have a slew of great local craft beer selections. Kudu is also perfect for downtowndwellers; otherwise you’ll be circling the block in search of parking for an eternity.

Starbucks, Multiple Locations

  1. Starbucks gets a lot of slack for being corporate, and while supporting local is always best, Starbucks isn’t so bad. They treat their employees pretty wonderfully actually, offering benefits to even part-timers. In West Ashley and Mt Pleasant you’ll find Starbucks with drive-thru windows, which is key for busy moms who can’t just unbuckle all three kids and run in and grab a quick coffee. (There is no such thing as a quick coffee when you’re a mom, unless there’s a drive-through!). Plus if you need to do some work on your laptop, at Starbucks you’ll find all you need for that: plenty of outlets, free wifi, lots of two-top tables and community tables. Starbucks is literally made for all of you laptop workers — be it freelancers or students.  AND most locations stay open until 9 p.m., while most other places shut down much earlier (5 or 6 p.m.).


What’s your favorite local coffee shop?

Charleston Market Statistics through March 2017

Charleston Market Statistics through February2017

We can comfortably consider the first quarter to have been a good start for residential real estate in 2017. There was certainly plenty to worry over when the year began. Aside from new national leadership in Washington, DC, and the policy shifts that can occur during such transitions, there was also the matter of continuous low housing supply, steadily rising mortgage rates and ever-increasing home prices. Nevertheless, sales have held their own in year-over-year comparisons and should improve during the busiest months of the real estate sales cycle.

The U.S. economy has improved for several quarters in a row, which has helped wage growth and retail consumption increase in year-over-year comparisons. Couple that with an unemployment rate that has been holding steady or dropping both nationally and in many localities, and consumer confidence is on the rise. As the economy improves, home sales tend to go up. It isn’t much more complex than that right now. Rising mortgage rates could slow growth eventually, but rate increases should be thought of as little more than a byproduct of a stronger economy and stronger demand.

Charleston Market Statistics through February2017

Daniel Island  |  Downtown Charleston  |  Folly Beach

Greater North Charleston  |  Kiawah Island  |  Johns Island

James Island  |  Isle of Palms/Wild Dunes  |  Lower Mount Pleasant

West Ashley  |  Upper Mount Pleasant  |  Upper Charleston Peninsula

Sullivans Island   |  Seabrook Island

Shop Local in Charleston this Spring

We love to shop, but more importantly we love to shop local! Charleston wasted no time this year — the warm days are upon us and it’s time to do some spring cleaning with the closet. Here are a few places where you can shop unique finds while also supporting local businesses. We’ve even included a place to take your wardrobe’s remnants from years past!

Bashful, 36 Windermere Blvd. West Ashley
There really is no such thing as window shopping at Bashful. The boutique stocks limited amounts of unique, trendy women’s wear, jewelry, and handbags, so you have to buy before it goes “bye!” You may remember it from its old location in Avondale, but the shop has upgraded now to more space in S. Windermere shopping center.

Shop Local Charleston

Consigning Women & Men, Photo Courtesy of Instagram User @consigningwomenandmen

Consigning Women, 21 Magnolia Road, West Ashley
Consigning Women & Men, 1055 Crickentree Village, Mt. Pleasant
A Charleston tradition since 1989, Consigning Women stocks only high-quality, name-brand, currently stylish clothing for a fraction of the original price. Bring in your own gently used clothes and not only will you be doing your once-chaotic closet a favor, but you’ll also get in on a very economic exchange. The shops are good for your wallet, but they’re great for the planet!

MOSA Boutique, 420 King Street, Downtown Charleston
From slinky sundresses to lace mini dresses, MOSA on King also has an in-store bar, complete with craft beer on tap, wine, and mimosas — mimosa, MOSA, get it? They’re stocked on both booze and spring styles, and their comfy seating area will ensure the spouse and kids have a place to rest while you shop.

Channels, 507.5 King Street, Downtown Charleston
Channels arrived to King Street in 2014, combining the surf and skate styles that the owners embrace in their everyday lives. You can expect to see a long list of quality brands here, including Citrine Swim, Reef, Boho Me, and Chucktown Inc. Summer styles range from cute and casual to cool and sporty, and their line of sunnies and swimwear is not to be missed.

Shop Local, Candy Shop VIntage

Candy Shop VIntage, Photo Courtesy of Instagram User @candyshopvintage

Candy Shop Vintage, 9 Cannon St, Downtown Charleston
Since 2009, Deirdre Zahl has sold incredible vintage jewelry and vintage-inspired jewelry as Candy Shop Vintage. Her own Candy Shop Collection consists of vintage-inspired jewelry that reflect the quality and craftsmanship of the vintage jewelry she has collected for many years. Zahl also introduced her own Charleston rice bead necklaces as an homage to flapper-style costume jewelry she’d discovered in her antique store digs. We think the whimsical colors and fun lengths make for a playful spring accessory.

Holy City Vintage Market
Holy City Vintage Market is a roaming pop-up market where many local vintage vendors who typically have online Etsy shops set up for the day and show you their latest wares. The market only pops up every two months or so, and the vendors can vary — and the vendors’ stock always varies! Each shop has a different eye/style so you’re sure to find something that’s you – from Runaround Sue’s vibrant 1960s style to Red Rose Vintage’s (a shop that travels in an updated vintage airstream) casual 80s gear to the boho, floral styles of Little French Dress. The next HCVM is on Easter Sunday April 16 at Park Cafe (730 Rutledge Avenue, downtown Charleston), so you can sip mimosas from the outside bar and shop while you wait for a brunch table!
Where will you shop this spring?

Dog-friendly Charleston: Where to eat and drink with your pups

In search of dog-friendly Charleston? Dining in the culinary haven of Charleston is always a treat, but it’s even sweeter when you can bring your furry best friend along.  We’ve found that there are several places particularly cool with pet customers, with some even providing water bowls so your pooch can stay hydrated in the Lowcountry heat.

Dog friendly Charleston Fuel @fuelcharleston

Chilling on the Patio at Fuel, Image Courtesy of Instagram User @fuelcharleston

Here are just a few of the spots we love the most — because they love the furry company we keep.

Downtown:

Fuel, 211 Rutledge Avenue

Formerly a gas station, Fuel is a fun spot for Caribbean-fused cuisine and comes complete with an outdoor bar, where pets and customers delightfully mingle.

Taco Boy, 217 Huger Street

An off-the-beaten-path local favorite, Taco Boy boasts delicious tacos, frozen screwdrivers, and a massive patio perfect for drinking in the sun with your pooch.

Kudu, 4 Vanderhorst Street

Kudu is known for its killer coffee and craft beer, and it’s particularly loved for its patio, where college kids, young, artsy professionals and more spend afternoons socializing or reading alone — with a pup in tow.

Mt Pleasant:

Two Blokes Brewery, 547 Long Point Road

Relatively new to the beer scene, Two Blokes Brewing serves not only well-crafted local brews, but on  the weekend it’s wild with both kids and dogs — so if you’re looking for a family friendly spot to consume an adult bev, this is a great spot.

Triangle Char & Bar, 1440 Ben Sawyer Blvd.

You may have to wait for a seat at brunch at Triangle, but at least your pooch can sit with you on the restaurant’s sun-blessed patio.

Dog friendly Charleston Poes Tavern @poestavern

Image Courtesy of Instagram User @poestavern

Sullivans Island:

Dunleavey’s Pub, 2213 Middle Street

What’s better than an Irish pub in a beach town? Not much. There are so many reasons to love this family-owned traditional pub, but great burgers, cool pints of Guinness, and dog-friendly outdoor seating top the list.

Poe’s Tavern, 2210 Middle Street

You may think an Edgar Allen Poe-themed bar and grill sounds a bit dark, but the lively, fun atmosphere of Poe’s Tavern will quickly change your mind. Nothing better than taking your four-legged kiddo for a walk on the beach and then heading to Poe’s for delicious fish tacos or one of their gourmet chicken sandwiches. Well-behaved dogs are regularly resting on the patio.

Folly Beach:

Lost Dog Cafe, 106 W Huron Avenue

Most Charlestonians don’t need a list of dog-friendly places to know about Lost Dog — this place was literally made for dogs. Well, the menu is very much for humans (and it’s all delicious) but you’ll see about a dozen dogs here on any given day — and more during Sunday brunch, which is basically our idea of heaven.

Jack of Cups, 34 Center Street

Also on Folly, Jack of Cups serves up Asian-infused food that’s so good you’ll leave satisfied and somewhat speechless. Their beer selection is top notch and ever-changing, and their backyard, as well as their front patio, complete with water bowls, are the reasons why you should bring your pups along.

Dog friendly Charleston The Barrel @thebarrelcharleston

Photo Courtesy of Instagram User @thebarrelcharleston

James Island:

The Barrel, 1859 Folly Road

If Lost Dog is first on everyone’s dog-friendly list, the Barrel is either tied or a close second. This is a great little spot for excellent craft beer pours, but the backyard is where it’s at. Unleashed dogs run free here, and there’s even a small pen for your tinier pups.

Bohemian Bull, 1531 Folly Road

Not far from the Barrel, the Bohemian Bull offers great food and cocktails but with a cool, outdoor, bohemian vibe where four-legged friends are always welcome.

West Ashley:

Home Team BBQ, 1205 Ashley River Road

The wings alone are reason enough to visit Home Team today and often, but nothing’s better than happy hour wings on the patio as you sneak a pork rind to your furry best friend.

Tin Roof, 1117 Magnolia Road

Tin Roof has always been dog-friendly, but it’s become increasingly so of late, with the back patio open for business with a back bar, so you can have a High Life while living the high life with your unleashed pups. Just don’t forget to clean up after them.
Where is your favorite spot to dine in dog-friendly Charleston?

 

Charleston Market Statistics Through February 2017

Market Stats blog image
The start of the year ushered in a wave of good news about a hot stock market, higher wages and an active home sales environment. At the same time, housing prices have continued to rise, and the low inventory situation and affordability crunch has been particularly hard on first-time buyers struggling to get into the market. Nevertheless, buyer activity is easily outpacing seller activity in much of the country, culminating in relatively quick sales and low supply. Demand definitely remained strong this month.
Closed Sales + 14.9% |  Med. Sales Price + 1.8% | Months Supply – 27.9%

Charleston Market Statistics through January 2017

Charleston Market Statisticss thru  Jan 2017
Charleston Market Statistics Show January Home Sales Exceed 1k For The First Time in A Decade!  
January brings out a rejuvenated crop of buyers with a renewed enthusiasm in a new calendar year. Sales totals may still inevitably start slow in the first half of the year due to ongoing inventory concerns. Continued declines in the number of homes available for sale may push out potential buyers who simply cannot compete for homes selling at higher price points in a low number of days, especially if mortgage rates continue to increase.
Wages are on the uptick for many Americans, while unemployment rates have remained stable and relatively unchanged for several months. The system is ripe for more home purchasing if there are more homes available to sell.
Closed Sales + 5.9% |  Median Sales Price + 9.9% | Months Supply – 27.9%

5 Things to Love About I’On

I'On

I’On, located in Mt. Pleasant, is a special neighborhood that is reminiscent of the beauty and charm that is so beloved in downtown Charleston — but without the narrow streets and lack of parking! A halfway point between downtown and Sullivan’s Island, I’On is nestled in a world of its own, where families thrive.

Founded in 1995, I’On is a village of sorts, with nearly 800 single-family homes, a square, six walking trails, and a grid full of narrow, quiet streets, lakes, green spaces, and so much more — like crab docks, a dozen pocket parks, a boathouse, spa, marsh views, and a wildlife refuge. And the name? “I’On” comes from Jacob Bond I’On, the first mayor of the town of Sullivan’s Island.

I'On

From fun and simple outdoor activities for the whole family to cute retail shops perfect for perusing on lazy weekend days, there’s a lot the residents of I’On love about their ’hood. We spoke with a few locals, and these are just a few of their favorite things to do and see:

  1. The Walks

As simple as it may sound, families relish living in a place where it’s safe to roam the streets, particularly here where there’s also plenty of sights to take in at every turn — like gates and gardens, yards and unique fountains. The sidewalks are wide, and so you’ll find that the residents’ feet are their favorite modes of transportation. I’On also has six trails, some of which are up to three hours long and cover eight miles of, including a 1.5-mile stroll along the marsh that can be ended with a beer at O’Brions Pub or a glass of wine at  Grazi’s Shoe Cafe and Wine Bar.

@obrionspub

O’Brions Pub, photo courtesy of Instagram user @obrionspub

  1. The Water

Who wouldn’t love living in walking distance of a body of water? Here, you’ll find Westlake, which also features an amphitheater that comes in handy for all kinds of family-friendly neighborhood events, and Eastlake, which is surrounded by beautiful houses and perfect for walks with your furry friends, fishing and feeding ducks. Plus there are picturesque creeks, sure signs you’re in the Lowcountry.

photo courtesy of Instagram user @wizard_of_ollie

photo courtesy of Instagram user @wizard_of_ollie

  1. The Green

There’s also tons of green space (and playgrounds!) here for both kids and pups to play in and the Rookery Wildlife Refuge, which features two observation towers.

  1. The Square

Besides the wine and beer spots, the Square also features an adorable gift shop called Sweet Olive and a cafe full of gourmet eats at Square Onion, where soups, salads, sandwiches, take-and-bake casseroles, desserts, and dips reign supreme. But if you want a cup of coffee, the best is only right outside the neighborhood at Collective Coffee. It’s an airy, hipster-y joint with the perfect cups of joe.

@sweetolivehome

Shop at Sweet Olive, photo courtesy of @sweetolivehome

  1. The Community

Not only is it common to know your neighbor here, but you’ll probably know every dog’s name in the area, too. Kids meet up at playgrounds, parents chat on front porches, and the whole of the community seems happy to be here.

I'On

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5 Ways to Unwind in Mount Pleasant

Mount Pleasant may be look small on a map, but the town packs in a lot of punch with countless shopping areas, restaurants, and places to watch the sunset throughout the area. From Shem Creek’s offerings along Coleman Boulevard to the possibilities aplenty at Highway 17’s Mount Pleasant Town Center, adventure awaits at every turn.

Mount Pleasant

Spa time at Woodhouse

Anyone who’s been to Woodhouse Day Spa knows this place doesn’t hold back in its offerings of luxurious pampering. The spa gives all a little TLC, relieves stress, and nurtures your well being. Everyone gets a robe and reflexology sandals upon arrival before unwinding in the quiet room, where loose-leaf teas await to begin the day of everything from waxings and skin care to massage therapy and sleep treatments. Woodhouse also offers a girls getaway weekend package, complete with hot stone and four-handed massages, facials, microdermabrasion, pedicures, and more. Learn more at charleston.woodhousespas.com.

Shop at Mount Pleasant Town Center

Spoil yourself with a day at Mount Pleasant Town Center, where not only can you update your wardrobe at Copper Penny Shooz, Banana Republic, Teal Boutique, White House Black Market, Victoria’s Secret, Belk, Chico’s, and Apricot Lane Boutique, and more, but you can also grab some tea at Teavana, some wine at the Wine Cellar, a pedicure at Sandals Nail Spa, and a Margarita at Qdoba Mexican Eats. To reward yourself even more, top it off with a film at the onsite cinemas.

Eat in the Old Village

Surrounded by beauty and charm, the six-room Old Village Post House Inn is a sweet wee spot for a staycation night away, but the restaurant is what makes the building renowned. Most days you’ll find seafood bliss with specialties like crawfish soup, broiled oysters, crispy calamari, chili-rubbed ahi tuna, grouper, crab cakes, shrimp & grits, lobster, crab-crusted salmon, and much more. But for Sunday funday, get brunch dishes, like deviled crab cake benedict and the Shem Creek omelet, with shrimp, crab, cheddar, and spinach. Don’t forget to start with a Sunrise Sparkler, a carafe of cava with peach nectar, blueberry pomegranate juice, and OJ. 

Mount Pleasant

Sunset drinks on Shem Creek

Speaking of Shem Creek and drinks, nothing says ‘this is the life’ quite like a sunset cocktail on Shem Creek. Whether you want live music at Red’s or a quiet view of the water at Vickery’s, there are plenty of places to perch and pass the hours. Tavern & Table, Shem Creek Bar & Grill, Water’s Edge Cabana Bar, and RB’s are just a few more spots where you can not only sip to the best sunset view in Charleston but you can also grab some of the freshest seafood around.

Dolphin watch cruise

The Charleston Water Taxi is always a fun way to travel on days you’re focused solely on adventure and relaxation, but the company also offers a dolphin watch cruise on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The ultimate way to unwind, the dolphin watch cruise lasts for an hour but $10 gets you an all-day pass so you can while away all the hours your heart desires. Departs from Patriot’s Point and the USS Yorktown. 

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