About dunes properties of Charleston

dunes properties of Charleston is a real estate, vacation rental and property management company representing the Lowcountry with almost 80 exclusive Charleston beach vacation rental properties, 70 real estate agents and employees, four full-service offices. Nobody knows the Charleston Coast better.

Isle of Palms Office

1400 Palm Boulevard
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
843.886.5600

Real Estate Inquiries:
realestate@dunesproperties.com
Vacation Rental Inquiries:
vacations@dunesproperties.com


Folly Beach Office

31 Center Street
Folly Beach, SC 29439
843.588.3800

Real Estate Inquiries:
realestate@dunesproperties.com
Vacation Rental Inquiries:
vacations@dunesproperties.com


The Real Estate Studio

214 King Street
Charleston, SC 29401
843.722.5618

Real Estate Inquiries:
realestate@dunesproperties.com
Vacation Rental Inquiries:
vacations@dunesproperties.com


Kiawah Seabrook Office

1887 Andell Bluff Boulevard
Johns Island, SC 29455
843.768.9800

Real Estate Inquiries:
realestate@dunesproperties.com
Vacation Rental Inquiries:
vacations@dunesproperties.com


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Tag: Recreation

4 Budget-Friendly Outdoor Activities in West Ashley

Looking for things to do in West Ashley?  From the always fun West Ashley Park to the brand new farmer’s market and Higgins Pier, there’s a lot of inexpensive (and free!) ways to spend your time outside west of the Ashley River. Here are four of our favorites:

West Ashley, Charleston, SC

Photo taken by @rachspeer

West Ashley Bikeway

The West Ashley Bikeway starts at Wappoo Road, crosses Highway 61/St Andrews Boulevard, and continues all the way to the beautiful Ashley River, connecting residential neighborhoods along the way, like Sherwood Forest, Maryville, and Ashleyville. And this is a particularly exciting time for the Bikeway, since this summer, Higgins Pier officially opened at the end of the path on the River. The last stretch of the path before the pier is a peaceful one surrounded by forests before giving way to the magnificent view of the marsh. At the pier, you may fish, launch a kayak, or simply meditate with a book under the covered pier head and while away a lovely Charleston Day.

West Ashley, Charleston, SC

photo taken by @dannymaymusic

West Ashley Greenway

The West Ashley Greenway is a sacred thing for nearby residents, who use the part-asphalt, part-dirt trail for running, walking dogs, and biking. The path is over eight miles long, extending from Wesley Drive (the South Windermere neighborhood) and nearly to Main Road, Johns Island. Along the way is everything from lush, wooded areas, where you can still find fireflies if you go at the perfect hour, to the breathtaking Lowcountry marsh. Go for a walk around 5.30 p.m. and you’ll likely pass many of your neighbors as it’s the most popular time of day to venture out. Don’t forget your bike lights if you go after dark, since the area is not well lit.

West Ashley Farmers Market

West Ashley Farmer’s Market

Ackerman Park – 55 Sycamore Avenue

This is a two-in-one spot, since you get both produce galore in the great outdoors, plus there’s a dog park — so everyone’s happy, pups included. Launching today, Wed. Sept. 21, 2016, the West Ashley’s farmer’s market is a huge, welcome addition to the area, since with it comes boocoos of both established and fresh, new producers and food products. Get in on the action while you can, because this farmer’s market only goes every Wednesday until October 26.

West Ashley Charleston,SC

photo taken by @tara_kaminski

West Ashley Park

3601 Mary Ader Avenue

Off Glenn McConnell Highway, you’ll find an oasis from the freeway at West Ashley Park, one of Charleston’s largest recreational parks. The park is 260 acres large, comprising everything from playgrounds (two) and a basketball court to a soccer field and an 18-hole disc golf course, which brings sports lovers of all ages and levels of expertise. Walk on the lush path past gorgeous swamps to a serene pond, where fishermen cast their lines and watch wild birds wander about. Bring your pups, too, because the park also boasts a dog park.

What’s your favorite outdoor spot in West Ashley?

Dunes Properties Volunteers at World’s Largest Oyster Roast

This Sunday at Boone Hall Plantation come say hello to many Dunes Properties agents, employees and even our President himself, Randy Walker.  We’ll  be volunteering on behalf of Hollings Cancer Center and serving up buckets of oysters  at the 2010 Lowcountry Oyster Roast.

The Greater Charleston Restaurant Association sponsors the festival and they go through about 65,000 pounds of oysters. This event has been named in the “top 20 events in the southeast” by the Southeastern Tourism Society.  

The festival offers many other food options from local restaurants as well entertainment, contests and activities for kids.  Proceeds benefit the Ronald McDonald House, Hollings Cancer Center, Travel Council and Charleston County Science Materials Resource Center. 

Here’s a few facts about oysters:

  1. There’s no way to tell males from females by their shells and they may change sexes a few times in their lifetime
  2. Oysters can be eaten 12 months a year (not just ones ending in “r”). The “r” myth probably came about when oysters needed to be shipped and there was inadequate refrigeration in the warmer months
  3. Oysters are nutritionally well balanced and recommended for low cholesterol diets

Bring your gloves, shucking knife, and appetite! We hope to see you there.

Charleston’s Waterfront Park is named one of America’s 10 Great Public Spaces


Yet another reason to love our fair city- Waterfront Park.  This past Sunday, my family and I packed a picnic and headed for that very spot.  It was a beautiful afternoon with a generous breeze and just enough sun, just enough shade. Waterfront Park is great because it’s got something for everyone. You can join the kids and get soaked to the bone in one fountain or just up to the ankles in the other. There are swings on the pier and benches scattered through the trees for romantic rendezvous or just restful relaxation. And the views are extraordinary. My husband and son threw the ball, I lounged in the shade, tourists took photos, friends gathered, walking tours passed, locals read the paper, walked their dogs, waved to their neighbors.  It was a nice way to spend the afternoon.  I wasn’t surprised today to read that Waterfront Park has made the American Planning Association’s 2008 list of the nation’s 10 great public spaces.

The professional planning association announced the country’s 10 great neighborhoods, 10 great streets and 10 great public spaces today. The lists are part of the association’s Great Places in America program, launched in 2007 to recognize what the group considers the essential building blocks of great communities.

The American Planning Association selects places annually that represent the “gold standard” in terms of having a true sense of place, cultural and historical interest, community involvement and a vision for tomorrow. They are places where people want to be. Way to go Charleston!

The winners of Great Places in America 2008 are not ranked but are listed alphabetically.

2008 Great Public Spaces in America:
•Central Park, New York City.
•Church Street Marketplace, Burlington, Vt.
•Mellon Square, Pittsburgh.
•Pioneer Courthouse Square, Portland, Ore.
•Santa Monica Beach, Santa Monica, Calif.
•Union Station, Washington, D.C.
•Waterfront Park, Charleston
•Waterplace Park, Providence, R.I.
•West Side Market, Cleveland.
•Yavapai County Courthouse Plaza, Prescott, Ariz.

-Traci Magnus

Charleston ranks high in “walkability”

I know gas is getting cheaper, but it still isn’t “cheap.”  By far the easiest, not to mention healthiest way to counter the high price of fuel is to walk. I realize that for some people, in some cities, this isn’t a practical solution.  But according to walkscore.com, a website that calculates a city or neighborhood’s “walkability,” Charleston is considered a “Walker’s Paradise”.  In fact, the Downtown neighborhood that is home to our Real Estate Studio scored a walk score of 97 out of 100.  Here’s how they determine the score:

“The Walk Score algorithm works by identifying the closest grocery stores, restaurants, coffee shops and other amenities near a given address. The neighborhoods are weighted by population and assigned a Walk Score between 0 and 100. Walk Scores greater than 70 indicate neighborhoods where it’s possible to get by without owning a car, while scores of 90+ qualify as a “Walker’s Paradise.”

In these environmetally-conscious times there are more reasons than ever for people to turn to their own two feet for transportation.  Here are a few answers to the question of “Why Walking Matters:”

Better health: A study in Washington State found that the average resident of a pedestrian-friendly neighborhood weighs 7 pounds less than someone who lives in a sprawling neighborhood. Residents of walkable neighborhoods drive less and suffer fewer car accidents, a leading cause of death between the ages of 15–45.

Reduction in greenhouse gas: Cars are a leading cause of global warming. Your feet are zero-pollution transportation machines.

More transportation options: Compact neighborhoods tend to have higher population density, which leads to more public transportation options and bicycle infrastructure. Not only is taking the bus cheaper than driving, but riding a bus is ten times safer than driving a car!

Increased social capital: Walking increases social capital by promoting face-to-face interaction with your neighbors. Studies have shown that for every 10 minutes a person spends in a daily car commute, time spent in community activities falls by 10%.

Stronger local businesses: Dense, walkable neighborhoods provide local businesses with the foot traffic they need to thrive. It’s easier for pedestrians to shop at many stores on one trip, since they don’t need to drive between destinations.”

“As Americans look to reduce their environmental impact and ease reliance on cars, the appeal of walkable communities continues to grow,” says Christopher Leinberger of the Brookings Institution. “People increasingly value the convenience and connectedness that vibrant, walkable communities offer – and the health, safety and environmental benefits are icing on the cake.

– Traci Magnus

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